Typical local German food! Guten Appetit!

Typical local German food! Guten Appetit!

We travel to experience the sights and sounds of a country or a city foreign to us.

 

Many (and I count myself with them) also make sure to taste the local food specialties because that’s part of the total experience.

 

France is one destination where all these are packaged in one pretty bundle (particularly that box of macarons). But I’m not going to talk about France. Instead, I want to tell you what you are missing by not getting to know Germany better, the country and it’s « cuisine » or in this case, the Deutsche Küche.

 

The Deutsche Küche is far from being fine cuisine. But who cares? Germans do hearty meals that will satisfy that hunger all the way to your toes, washed down there by their famous cold Bier. It’s good old peasant food and who cannot love it?

 

Sauerbraten, Jäger Schnitzel , Zieguener Schnitzel , Schweinshaxe ,  Panierte Schweinebacken (breaded pig’s cheeks), Bratwurst, Kartoffelknödel, Rotkohl, Bratkartoffeln,  Kartoffelpuffer,  Weisswurst with Honig Senf, Apfelkücherl,  Bienenstichkuchen, Schmarn, Rotegrütze: The list can be very long. These are just a few that come to mind and are already making  my mouth water.

 

Sauerbraten is pickled meat  roast, originally prepared with  horsemeat, meat that  is so tough it needs several days soaking in vinegar to tenderise . Most German  restaurants serve this dish, which most say originated from the Rhineland. Its perfect partners are the Kartoffelknoedel or  good old fashioned Bratkartoffeln (pan fried thinly sliced or diced potatoes) and Rotkohl (pickled red cabbage) a must. Bratkartoffel is also the best accompaniment for Schnitzel (breaded pork chops) served either with a mushroom sauce (Jager Schnitzel) or with tangy tomato sauce (Zigeuner Schnitzel). Schweinshaxe is perfect with a Mass of good ol’ German Bier.

 

Kartoffelpuffer, another potato dish (you must have guessed by now that Kartoffel means potato in German), is very much like the Jewish Latkes. Most people love to eat it with Apfelmus (apples cooked to  baby food consistency. The English call it applesauce.) Some, though, are quite happy to have it with freshly ground pepper and some put it between white bread.  I swear.

 

Germans love their Wurst and they have countless varieties. But I take a particular liking for Weisswurst (white sausage), a typical Bavarian sausage, that  should  be eaten before midday and preferrably with honey mustard or Honigsenf.

 

For dessert, other than Dr Oetker’s vanilla or chocolate pudding, I love love love Apfelkücherl (apple beignet) served hot with a scoop of vanilla ice cream,   Bienenstichkuchen to go with my tea or coffee or when I’m in a local market , Schmarn (a very Bavarian dessert dish).

 

Typical beverage is Bier, of course, but in Muenster,  they have the Altbier Bowle, beer that is slightly darker than lager with pieces of fruit swimming in it.  The Rhineland, if you must know,  is Altbier country.

 

This piece can go on for another 500 words  if I tell you what other lip smacking dishes await you in Germany. Why not  come and « discover » Germany yourself and make your own list of favourite German food and beverage. I just wanted to whet your appetites so you get that final push. Germany will pleasantly surprise you.

 

 

Written and contributed by Michael and Marlys

Easy Hiker http://easyhiker.co.uk