See the Lava flows of the Hawaii Volcanoe National Park

See the Lava flows of the Hawaii Volcanoe National Park

Lava flows Of course, the thing that many people are most interested in seeing is the active flow zone of Kilauea.

Here you can witness new earth being created, and the stunning beauty of the active lava flows.

Kilauea Volcano has erupted lava continuously from its east rift zone since 1983. These lava flows have created over 568 acres (230 hectares) of new land and covered 8.7 mi (14 km) of highway with lava as deep as 115 ft (35 m).

When planning a visit to the volcano, it pays to check the Hawaii Volcano Observatory (www) to get an idea of the amount of current activity, as well as the distance to the viewing area from the road.

Nature is dynamic, and fickle; sometimes there are gorgeous rivers of lava, and at other times nothing.

You can also hear a recording of the latest lava viewing opportunities by calling +1 808 985-6000, then pressing "1" and "1". NOTE: 808 is Hawaii's area code, This is not a toll-free number.

After nightfall visitors may see spots of red incandescence or glow, in the steam/fume cloud as lava enters the ocean, from the "steam plume" viewing area, a 1/2 mile walk on the roadway from the ranger station at end of Chain of Craters Road and an additional 5 minute (200 yard) walk on a trail.

If you choose to hike out beyond the end of the road, do not hike during the heat of the day (10AM-2PM). This is a difficult hike and visitors should prepare well for the trek over the rugged, steep, and sharp terrain. The hike to the lava delta is over a rough, uneven, fractured lava landscape. Lava is no longer entering the ocean at this point although, there are two lava flows entering the ocean quite a distance (perhaps a couple of miles further) from this point. This hike is not for everyone.

Hikers need to be sure-footed, physically fit, and well prepared.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License.Based on a work at Wikitravel.org & Traveldudes.org.

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