Information about public transport, taxi & using a car in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Information about public transport, taxi & using a car in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Getting around in Kuala Lumpur...

By bus
City Shuttles

RapidKL's City Shuttle (Bas Bandaran in Malay, hence the B prefix in its route numbers) buses come in handy for tourists. The 10 routes cover most major areas in Kuala Lumpur city centre. The fare for City Shuttles is RM2 for the whole day. If you buy an integrated daily pass (Sepadu) for only RM7, you can ride any RapidKL bus and LRT for as many trips as you like for the whole day. Buy a ticket on your first ride and just flash your ticket at the driver for all subsequent rides.

All City Shuttles have a B prefix in their route numbers. Most City Shuttles operate from "hubs" which can be accessed by rail-based public transport. The routes are:

B101: Titiwangsa to KL Sentral via Jalan Tunku Abdul Rahman
B102: Titiwangsa to Bukit Bintang via Kampung Baru
B103: Titiwangsa to Bukit Bintang via KLCC
B105: KLCC to MidValley Megamall via City Centre
B110: MidValley Megamall to Bukit Bintang via City Centre
B111: Maluri to Chow Kit
B112: Maluri to KL Sentral via Jalan Loke Yew
B113: Maluri to Pasar Seni
B114: Maluri to Titiwangsa via KLCC
B115: Pasar Seni to Jalan Duta government offices
Other services

RapidKL also operates other bus routes which serve the far flung suburbs of the Klang Valley. There is little reason to use them unless you are going to be living in Kuala Lumpur for a period of time.

There are many other bus operators besides Rapid KL (Metrobus, Len Seng, Permata Kiara, Selangor etc) and a severe lack of signboards and other forms of passenger information makes Kuala Lumpur's complete bus network just a little too complicated for a short-term traveller to fathom. Specific bus information is given at each place of interest on this page.

by taxi
With RM2 flagfall and RM0.10 for every 200m after the first 2 km, red and white normal taxis are not very expensive in Kuala Lumpur and are probably the best way to get around, at least outside the congested peak hours. Note that bright yellow premium taxis have a RM4 flagfall and also charge a bit more by the kilometre. There are also various small surcharges for radio call (RM2), baggage (RM1 per piece), etc.

Taxis in Kuala Lumpur and its suburbs are metered but when demand exceeds supply or during rush hour, they may ask for a fixed price before commencing travel. This is technically illegal (and reportable), and happens most often with what may be regarded as 'lazy taxi drivers' - that is, those that have so much time to spare that they are conveniently waiting outside hotels, long distance bus/train stations, or at typical tourist sites such as shopping centres and temples. It is cheaper to disregard these if they will not use a meter, and flag down a taxi that is cruising by (he will more likely be an honest driver) -although sometimes it is unavoidable that one must ride at a fixed-price. In that case, at least halve the price and work upwards. Surprisingly, around RM5 should cover most cross town trips of 15 minutes or so, even with traffic.

It is cheaper to use the meter through the day, although the opposite is true late at night, and especially after midnight, when the displayed meter price at the end of the journey is increased by 50% (ie. at 1AM, if the meter shows RM12, then you have to pay RM12+6).

by car
Driving in Kuala Lumpur can be a nightmare, with heavy traffic, a convoluted web of expressways and poor signage to guide you through it all. Reckless drivers are common - Malaysia infamously has one of the highest road accident rates in the world. Suicidal motorcyclists will also keep you on your toes.

Do not park at the road of busy districts such as Bangsar, Bukit Bintang etc. Other cars might lock you in by parking next to you in the 2nd or 3rd lane. Use covered car parks or park a bit off the beaten path and then walk back.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License.Based on a work at Wikitravel.org & Traveldudes.org.