Offbeat Motorcycle weekend - SE Brazil - Serra da Mantiqueira

A collection of motorcycle road trips across Brazil (and some other stuff):

Offbeat Motorcycle weekend - SE Brazil - Serra da Mantiqueira

The weekend of June 18 and 19 2011 we set out on a weekend motorcycle trip through the Serra da Mantiqueira, with its endless dirt roads, gorgeous landscapes, waterfalls, rivers and small rural villages, and the “Vale Histórico do São Paulo“, also known as the “Estrada dos Tropeiros” one of the historically most important regions of Brazil during the Coffee era.

It was along this route that the first emperor of Brazil (Dom Pedro I) traveled from Rio de Janeiro to São Paulo to declare the independence of Brazil in 1822.

 

We rode north out of Volta Redonda and shortly after leaving the city, we were on the RJ153, winding through a hilly landscape towards Nossa Senhora do Amparo, one of the first small villages we would pass along the way.
From Amparo, we continued north on the RJ153 and crossed the state border with Minas Gerais, to arrive in Santa Rita de Jacutinga, where we stopped briefly to admire the Igreja Matriz.

Our next goal was Passa Vinte, another little village situated at the confluence between the states of Minas Gerais and Rio, where the mountains form a valley that looks like the concave shell of a large oyster. the initial inhabitants of Passa Vinte gave the place the name “Cedro” (cedar) due to the large amount of these trees in the region. We quickly passed Passa Vinte to push on to Fumaça, home to the famous “Cachoeira da Fumaça” a cascading waterfall of approximately 1,5 km long, that we couldn’t pass by without stopping to take a few pictures.

From there, the road became more rugged as we commenced a long climb, following the Rio Preto, which forms the border between Rio de Janeiro and Minas Gerais states, to arrive in Bocaina de Minas around 14.00h. We decided to have lunch in a typical “mineiro” restaurant, where you take your plate into the kitchen, where all the food is on the stove and load up all you can eat for about 10 R$ (5 USD) per person – inclusive drinks. After lunch, we had another 60 km of Dirt roads ahead, with a few more technical sections, to get to Itamonte so we couldn't take too much of a pause in Bocaina de Minas.

We reached Itamonte, our place for the night around 17.00h, just before it would start to get dark and spent the night at Pousada Riberão do Ouro, a rural pousada located about 5 km south of Itamonte. For 100R$ per person (Single room) or 136R$ (double room) we enjoyed great hospitality in a pleasant, green setting. The pousada has a swimming pool, a children’s playground, a fishing pond and a restaurant serving typical cuisine of Minas Gerais.

 

The next morning, after a delightful breakfast, we started the second day of our trip. After the many kilometers of dirt road of the day before, today would be a day with more asphalt roads, starting with the 50 km descent from Itamonte to Engenheiro Passos, where we would take the Dutra highway for about 10 km, take the exit in Queluz and from there push on to Silveiras, the first of the historical cities of the Vale Histórico.

The descent from Itamonte to the Dutra highway is almost 50 km of twisties, winding through the fabulous Mantiqueira landscape, littered with spectacular views of the Itatiaia park region. The quality of the asphalt starts out to be excellent when leaving Itamonte, which is tempting to open the gas a little more, but once across the São Paulo border, the road quality decreases significantly and we had to keep the speed down.

We made it to the Dutra highway, then to Queluz and started our next leg to Silveiras which would take us through a section of dirt road that I had never taken before, but since it was indicated on my GPS, I figured it would be ok. Turned out that this road, after a few kilometers, became a private road and so we started following another road that seemed to go in the direction of Silveiras, but was not on my GPS. At one point we came at a T-section and took a right turn. After a few kilometers, we encountered a local man and I asked for directions. Apparently, this road would eventually become too bad for the bikes and even for the Land Rover, and according to him, we should have gone to the left at the T-section. We backtracked the short distance and eventually got on the right road, which connected to the Estrada dos Tropeiros, and we arrived in Silveiras.

Silveiras is the place where the headquarters of the National Foundation of Tropeiros was established. The tropeiros were the people who traveled long distances with a pack of mules to transport goods from one big city to another. Usually from Rio to São Paulo or vice versa. Tropeiros also used to transport gold and diamonds from the interior of Minas Gerais to the coast. A local guy who introduced himself as Toninho came up to us and started telling us about the horseback tours that he organises in the region. They go with a group of people on horseback, traveling through the region the way the ancient Tropeiros used to do. Seems to me like a great way to spend a few days.

 

After taking in the atmosphere in Silveiras, we moved on to Areias. The cities here are all located around 25 km from each other. This is the distance a tropa could generally travel in one day. Areias was once one of the richest cities of São Paulo state, thanks to the coffee industry that was flourishing here. It was also the preferred weekend getaway for the coffee barons of the region. During our stop in Areias, we decided not to stay on the Estrada dos Tropeiros, but take another route that would lead us back north to the Serra da Mantiqueira and the dirt roads. I found a dirt road leading to Resende, from where we could get to Penedo and from there further on to Visconde de Maua.

We pushed on to São José do Barreiro, which is the place from where you can get access to the Bocaina National Park, and found the entrance to the dirt road to Resende about 14 km further. It was the first time I took this road and was pleasantly surprised with its condition. We took Gas in Penedo and started the climb towards Visconde de Maua. Halfway to Visconde de Maua, we turned right to get to Pedra Selada, from where we went on to Fumaça. The last leg of the trip took us to Falcão, Quatis, Amparo and finally Volta Redonda.

After almost 500 km of motorcycling, we needed a suitable closing of the weekend, so after everybody had the chance to clean up and have a snack, we gathered at the International Karting track of Volta Redonda. where we gave in to our need for speed for one last time.
 

Hope you enjoyed this...

 

Written and contributed by Raf
www.mirantes-mototravel.com